Northern Ag Network
Northern Ag Network
Northern Broadcasting System    Northern News Network    Northern Sports Network
Search This Site...
Search This Site...

Featured Stories

Spring Deworming – Breaking the Cycle

Spring Deworming – Breaking the Cycle

2/10/2017 4:22:00 PM/Categories: General News, Today's Top 5, People in Ag, Convention Conversations, National Cattlemen's Beef Association



Today’s progressive cattle producer has a strong grasp on factors that can cut into efficiency and profits in their operation. Still, many underestimate the effects that parasites can have on cattle health and, ultimately, productivity and profitability. One way to increase profitability is to consider treating cows for parasites each spring with an extended-release dewormer.



“In parasite control, timing and duration is everything,” says Joe Dedrickson, DVM, Ph.D., Merial Veterinary Professional Services. “Controlling parasites at spring turnout is an important cost-effective way to gain reproductive efficiencies now and boost calf weaning weights later.”

He adds that it is important for cattle producers to understand the parasite life cycle when developing a deworming strategy.



“In the southern United States, the first deworming should take place in the spring to help protect cattle from infective larvae on pastures and help reduce pasture parasite loads,1” says Dr. Dedrickson. “Ideally, parasite control products should continue to be effective or be re-applied strategically to last at least 100 days.”

That’s because parasitologists have shown that it takes that long to break the parasite life cycle, and breaking the parasite life cycle is the key to reducing the parasite burden on the pasture.2,3 He notes that most parasite control products last from 14 to 42 days and require bringing cattle up for multiple applications.

“The benefit of breaking the parasite life cycle is better-performing cattle throughout the grazing season and pastures with lower parasite loads to infect calves or re-infect cows in the summer and fall,” Dedrickson says. “Strategically dewormed beef cattle have been shown to produce more milk, have improved feed efficiency, improved reproductive efficiency and have a stronger immune system to fight off other diseases.”

Because every producer’s situation is unique, Dedrickson recommends checking labels to determine the length of parasite control a deworming product offers and consulting with a veterinarian to develop a deworming strategy. He also suggests keeping the following in mind: “The time of year when the grazing season begins, age and category of the animals, type of operation and grazing history of the pasture are all considerations to discuss.”

 

Source:  Merial press release

 

NCBA Convention Conversations brought to you by LongRange

 
Print

Leave a comment

Name:
Email:
Comment:
CAPTCHA image
Enter the code shown above in the box below
Add comment

Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message:
x

Recent Ag News

One of the Premier Women’s Agriculture Conferences in Montana Happens This Week

9/25/2017 9:00:00 PM
Ladies make plans to join others at the 2017 Women Stepping Forward for Agriculture Conference, presented by Farm Equipment Sales of Glasgow, Plentywood, Culbertson, and Circle, MT!   >> Read More
Article rating: No rating

Farmer Mac Releases Quarterly Analysis for Agriculture

9/25/2017 10:32:00 AM

With higher interest rates, downward pressure on commodity prices, and trade issues, agriculture is facing its share of headwinds. But some opportunities do exist for producers.

>> Read More
Article rating: No rating

Public Lands Stewards Recognized by BLM at PLC Meeting

9/22/2017 1:57:00 PM
 
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (September 22, 2017) – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today, announced three 2017 Rangeland Stewardship Award recipients at the Public Lands Council (PLC) Annual Meeting in Flagstaff, Ariz. Recipients included Utah rancher, Bill Kennedy, the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association, and The Stewardship Alliance of Northeastern Elko County.
  >> Read More
Article rating: No rating

Outcome Based Grazing Allows Flexible Livestock Management on Public Land

9/22/2017 10:26:00 AM
WASHINGTON (September 22, 2017) – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today launched a demonstration program allowing stakeholders in the grazing community an opportunity to achieve rangeland health goals on public land while allowing greater flexibility in livestock management decisions. The program focuses on responsive outcome based grazing on public lands. >> Read More
Article rating: No rating

Montana Towns

9/21/2017 4:52:00 PM

Montana Towns circa 1920.

>> Read More
Article rating: No rating
RSS

Find Articles by Date

«September 2017»
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
283023
456910
1114151617
18212324
2526272829301
2345678