In the latest round of crop progress reports from USDA NASS, corn planting progress took a quite large and slightly bearish leap.  Nineteen percent of the U.S. corn crop is now in the ground.  That was up 13{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} on the week but is still below the 28{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} five-year average.

While corn planting has been going for a few weeks now, soybean seeding was reported for the first time.  As of Sunday, 3{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of soybeans are in the ground.  That's pretty close to average.

Nationally speaking, spring wheat is 18{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} planted.  This is up 8{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} on the week but down 12{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} from the five-year average.  Breaking it down in our region, 19{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of Montana's spring wheat acres have been planted.  This is ahead of 2013 but 10{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} behind the five-year average.  At 9{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e}, Wyoming's spring wheat planting is 3{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} behind last year and 17{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} behind the five-year average.  South Dakota spring wheat seeding is clipping along at a good pace with 42{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of the crop planted, ahead of 12{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of this time last year but behind the 46{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} five-year average.  Last, but definitely not least, North Dakota spring wheat was 3{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} planted as of Sunday.  That's near last year's 2{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} at this time bug behind the 19{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} five-year average.

Nationally, winter wheat conditions worsened slightly in the last week.  Thirty-three percent of the crop is rated as being in good-to-excellent condition.  In comparison, Montana sees 64{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of it's crop receiving those top two ratings.  That number in Wyoming is 48{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e}, in South Dakota it's 65{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e}, and in North Dakota it's 46{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e}.  Long story short, our region's winter wheat is perceivably in better condition that the wheat in the rest of the nation.

Another standout in this week's reports were the topsoil and subsoil moistures!  

In Montana, subsoil moisture is rated at 86{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} adequate-to-surplus.  The same can be said of 80{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of Wyoming's, 78{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of South Dakota's, and 97{0a3336b3da8cf935de4f3eb78fe29508c4b8b5ebd27d01af2d815614325d533e} of North Dakota's.

To see the full reports, click on your state's name in the list below:

Montana

Wyoming

North Dakota

South Dakota

© Northern Ag Network 2014

Haylie Shipp

 

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